Wind instruments in a regal setting

A concert at Gripsholm Castle will feature gems performed by the Army Music Corps: Mozart's Adagio for Five Clarinets, Reger's rarely heard Serenade in B♭ Major and Richard Strauss's great sonatina From an Invalid's Workshop.

There is a long tradition of royal wind music. As early as the 16th century, wind musicians played at castles and manor houses on various occasions. For example, they would play to mark the arrival or departure of the lord of the manor, at services and during banquets.

The 18th century saw the emergence of a format generally known as a serenade ensemble. This was usually a small group composed mostly of woodwind instruments and a couple of French horns, who would normally play to accompany dining.

Mozart was followed by famous composers such as Beethoven, Brahms and Richard Strauss who wrote music for serenade ensembles. The most famous is probably Mozart's Gran Partita.

During the concert, which will be held in the Hall of State at Gripsholm Castle, the Army Music Corps will perform Mozart's Adagio for Five Clarinets, Reger's Serenade in B♭ Major and Richard Strauss's sonatina From an Invalid's Workshop.

The Army Music Corps

The Army Music Corps is the Swedish Armed Forces' largest orchestra. The music corps consists of 53 full-time musicians and conductors. The corps is part of the Life Guard, and is stationed in Stockholm.

Accessibility
Gripsholm Castle has many stairs. There are no lifts or ramps.