Highlight: The Chinese Pavilion

One July evening in 1753, Queen Lovisa Ulrika was surprised with a fantastic birthday present. In the far section of Drottningholm Palace Park, King Adolf Fredrik had secretly had a summer palace built in the Chinese style.

“He took me to the side of the pleasure gardens, and I was surprised to find myself suddenly standing in front of a real fairy tale palace, as the King had commissioned a Chinese pavilion – the most beautiful building imaginable.”

At that time, all things Chinese were the latest fashion. The East India trading companies brought large quantities of tea, spices, silk, porcelain and exclusive works of art to Europe during the 18th century. China was seen as an exotic, mythical country, and the Chinese Pavilion is the embodiment of this oriental fantasy.

Inside the pavilion, Chinese-inspired Swedish Rococo furniture stands alongside imported Chinese objects. Several of the rooms still have their original Chinese silk and paper wall coverings. There are also lacquered screens, stained glass, porcelain and other decorative objects, many of which were probably imported by the Swedish East India Company. However, some of the Chinese objects here are even older, including pieces from the times of Queen Hedvig Eleonora and Queen Kristina, when porcelain was incredibly expensive.

The Chinese Pavilion is located in Drottningholm Palace Park, and is open daily from May to September for self-guided visits.

Photo: Lisa Raihle Rehbäck/Royal Palace

The Green Room. The Chinese Pavilion was built in the middle of the 1700s, a period in European history when chinoiserie was the height of fashion. Photo: Alexis Daflos/Royal Palace

The Yellow Room with Chinese lacquer-panel insets in the walls. Photo: Alexis Daflos/Royal Palace

Visit us

You can walk round the Chinese Pavilion yourself, but if you want to broaden your knowledge on the castle, there are audio guides at the ...

Read more

Discover more at The Chinese Pavilion

The Chinese Pavilion was built in the middle of the 1700s, a period in European history when chinoiserie was the height of fashion. Today...

Read more

The first pavilion, a prefabricated building, was erected here in 1753 as a birthday present to Queen Lovisa Ulrika. It was built in a Ch...

Read more

A selection of products linked to the pavilion are available for sale at the Chinese Pavilion.

Read more

Customer service

Opening hours: Closed

FAQ

  • Is it possible to take wedding photos in the palace parks?

    It is permitted to take wedding photos for private use in our palace parks. Please respect the following: it is not permitted to set up bulky photography equipment and/or props, to cordon off or drive vehicles onto our park areas or in any other way disturb other park visitors.
    Please note the special stipulations for photography in our Image and Media Gallery.

  • Can I pre-book a ticket for the general palace tours?

    Tickets can be purchased on the same day at any of our ticket offices; no advance purchase available.

  • Are there any storage lockers at the royal palaces?

    The Royal Palace of Stockholm: There are a few storage lockers available at Tickets & Information and in the Tre Kronor Museum. However, we would recommend not bringing any large bags with you. The other royal palaces and visitor attractions: No storage lockers available.

  • Can I take my bag into the royal palaces?

    Small bags are permitted at our visitor attractions. Rucksacks should be carried in your hand or on your front. Do not leave any bags unattended. Bags and cases with wheels are not permitted.

  • Can I take a pushchair into the royal palaces?

    Pushchairs are not permitted indoors.

More FAQ